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Can an OPK be used as an early home pregnancy test?

Updated: Oct 25, 2021

Time after time we hear the question, “If my OPK is positive but my period is due any day could this mean i’m pregnant?” and as the title states, ”Can I use an OPK as an early pregnancy test?”. If you too are looking for answers on OPKs as an early hpt, you are in luck, we have searched the internet wide and far to collect a summary from what medical professionals have to say VS. what some very confident mamas swear by as “proof” of an early positive using an OPK. Read on to find out more.


Same Day Comparision - TOP: OPK positive test, BOTTOM: hpt positive test

First, let‘s clear up what an OPK is... formally known as an ovulation prediction kit, an OPK can be bought in the form of a classic strip test or a digital test, pretty much identical in appearance to an hpt and taken the same way you would take an hpt. OPKs are a great tool for trying to conceive, using an OPK allows you to confirm hormone spikes indicating ovulation. Keep in mind, a positive OPK does NOT confirm ovulation itself.


The only for sure way to confirm ovulation is through ultrasound, which is a pretty unrealistic way for the average woman to confirm ovulation at home. The second best and easiest way (at home) to predict and confirm ovulation is through basal body temperature tracking. Check back soon for our upcoming article all about temping with more detailed info on bbt tracking, and how to use your bbt chart to detect and confirm ovulation. In the meantime, check out our forum category dedicated to temping and share your voice today!


Okay, now that we have our OPK basics down, it’s time to cut to the chase on what you’ve been waiting for.......Can an OPK be used to detect early pregnancy? The ruling is in and unfortunately, however tempting it may be to pee on any stick in sight (trust us, we get it), medical professionals agree an ovulation predictor kit (OPK) should not and cannot be used as a home pregnancy test (hpt). The tests each check for different hormones. An OPK checks for an increase in the LH hormone while a home pregnancy test checks for the presence of hCG. In early pregnancy LH increases as well as to the time before your period, making the OPK unreliable for detecting early pregnancy.


TOP: negative OPK, MIDDLE: positive OPK, BOTTOM: negative hpt

In reverse, a negative OPK does NOT mean you are not pregnant. It’s best to leave it at this... they are two completely different tests, testing for two completely different hormones, and have two completely different intentions of use. OPK manufacturers will also tell you that they do not recommend using their tests to detect early pregnancy.


With that said and out of the way... some women still believe in the “OPK trick“ for detecting early pregnancy. There are tons of woman who have used OPKs to detect early pregnancy. With photos of both test types taken simultaneously, showing a progression in OPK lines compared to a build up in line strength on an hpt (see photo below for example).

There is an equal amount of women who have attempted to use an OPK to detect early pregnancy, and get negative OPKs to then get a positive hpt. It’s pretty 50/50 as far as the number of personal accounts go of women TTC, to wether an OPK worked as an hpt. Some go as far as to state a positive OPK before their period was their first sign of possible pregnancy leading them to then take an hpt for a BFP (big fat positive).


In sum, we all know someone who swears by using OPKs as and early hpt, and heck most of us have already peed on more OPKs than we would like to admit in attempt to detect early pregnancy, us ladies here at preggomyeggo.com will pee on just about anything if it can give us that BFP. All in all, the choice is yours, but best to save your money ladies and your OPKs and just opt for buying an hpt. Hopefully you can ditch the OPKs all together soon, baby dust!!! Xoxoxo


No medical advice or general advice is being offered to the reader, this article is a collection of personal experiences, informal research, and NOT a medical source by any means.


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